The Fujifilm X-T1 in Iceland | Mark Allen


I thought I would share some of my experiences with using the X-T1 for 12 days in Iceland. I come from a full frame Nikon background and all the big heavy f/2.8 lenses, etc. I always shot in raw, adjusted in Capture NX and never used live view. The X-T1 has changed the way I work. I’ll outline some of the things I liked and disliked about the X-T1 and point out a few mistakes I made on the way. Hopefully this will be of interest to new X-T1 owners.……


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Crop or Crap? Zack Arias Tackles The Question Of Full Frame vs Crop Sensors | SLR Lounge


Zack Arias is one of the biggest names in photography education of recent years. He built his name on the idea that a photographer can use one light to create stunning images. Today, I am sharing a recent video Zack did tackling the age old (haha, not really) question of Full Frame Sensors vs APS-C Sensors. “I have said, in the past, that you should move toward full frame sensors. I have always championed full frame sensors.” Zack states in the description of his video, “At the end of the day, full frame sensors beat APS sized and smaller sensors.” …….


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Iceland with the Fuji XE1 / Fuji Travel Photography | Colin Nicholls


At last count I had visited Iceland a total of three times, the first I was an amature photographer and went with a Nikon D60 + 18-105 lens, the second I had got better and went with a D90 +24/50/135 lenses, the last time was after I fell for Fuji and went with 2 XE1’s; 8mm, 18mm, 35mm, 60mm and 50-230mm lenses. I’ve blogged about my time in Iceland before but have decided to put this post together to keep it all in one place and show you some photography of this awesome place! One thing that keeps me coming back to Iceland is the quick changing nature of the weather and the raw unspoilt landscapes that greet you around every bend, as this was my third time out I was very much ready for what would be in store and some very good ideas of places I wanted to visit. All the photos here were shot on 2 Fuji XE-1’s the size and weight of these cameras make them great for travel and the image quality is just incredible, at no point did I feel the need for anything more that the gear I had and would be happy to travel anywhere in the world with just this small bag of gear…….




See on colinnichollsphotography.com

Okinawa with the Fuji TCL-X100 | Thomas Alan


In part one I put the new Fuji TCL through it’s paces to see how well it would perform in a studio portrait environment. In part two I take it outside to see how it does in more everyday situations. First off, I headed over to the seawall on a bright, blue sky day. Walking around shooting at the beach was a breeze, pun intended, and overall the TCL was a pleasure to shoot with outdoors. The following shots are all straight out of camera with Lightroom v5.5 Lens Correction applied, except for a couple of adjustments that I’ve noted in each image caption…….


See on thomasalanphoto.com

Review | The Fujifilm XF10-24mmF4 R OIS | Leigh Mille


These days my zoom range is the “general purpose” 24-70mm (Olympus M.Zuiko 12-40mm F2.8 Pro), not too wide and not too long but more or less suitable for a wide range of subjects. In my 35mm days that was the Canon EF 24-70mm F2.8L. I shot for about a year with that as my only zoom lens and when I needed something wider I would rent or borrow the EF16-35 F2.8L. Both of these lenses were useful but had issues with focus accuracy and sharpness. I hear-tell Canon has released a new version of the 16-35 (it’s now a 16-35mm F4 with image stabilisation). I’ve personally used the latest version of the 24-70mm F2.8L MKII (awesome but expensive!). If you want to make images with a little something special then you need to go wider than that general purpose zoom. You need a wide angle prime lens or a wide angle zoom. I’ve previously used the excellent XF 14mm F2.8 but stuck at one focal length in that range can be limiting sometimes. I was particularly interested in the XF10-24mm Fuji lens because of an upcoming assignment which will require me to take a series of wide angle shots and combine various elements into one composite image……


See on leighmiller.zenfolio.com

Things I wish I would have known | Vic Schmeltz


I really should have entitled this, “Things I wish I would have done”, but I will get to that in a minute. I received my first film camera 51 years ago and have had film camera’s off and on since then. It wasn’t until 2010 that I purchased my first digital camera, a Nikon D5000. I wrote about my journey to mirrorless here if you are interested. For the first week I shot on “auto” so I could get to know the camera but my goal from the beginning was to be able to shoot in manual, which I did pretty quickly. I did the same with my Nikon D300s and D700 as the external controls made that fairly simple. I like to be able to have the settings the way I want them. When I was growing up I was the same way. I learned to drive a car at 14 in a Ford Falcon with a straight six and three on the tree. A manual transmission is something I like to use but unfortunately my left knee is not up to the task anymore. I do like the idea of being able to control what gear I am in and the engine’s rpm’s but now I have to drive an auto transmission…..


See on vicsfujixblog.com

Streets of Tokyo | Gabor Nagy


I haven’t blogged for a while now, but loads of things happened in the last couple of months. Couple of photo shoots, weddings, holiday, new website and a new camera… What, new camera? Oh, yeah. I finally said good bye to my Canon kit and got an X-T1 with a 56mm lens to accompany my X-Pro1 and X100s. Wasn’t an easy decision, but time will tell. So far I’m loving it, but because I have plenty of editing to do, I haven’t spent huge amount of time with it. My lovely wife and I spent a week in Tokyo in the middle of July and it was amazing. It wasn’t hard to fall in love with the city and the people in it. The following images are just a little preview from our trip. All photos were taken with the Fuji X100s and the new X-T1.


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Talent vs. Practice: Why Are We Still Debating This?

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The development of high achievement involves a complex interaction of many personal and environmental variables that feed off each other in non-linear, mutually reinforcing, and nuanced ways. When I was a little kid, my mom and grandmom were having a heated argument in the front of the car. At one point I interrupted them, and with exasperation said: “You know, Mom, Grandmom is really right.” Then I turned to my grandmom and said, “I think my Mom is right too.” They were shocked, because I had rarely talked much until that moment. Thankfully, there was silence for the rest of the car ride…..


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Neurowissenschaftler: Ohne Emotionen geht es nicht

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Der Hirnforscher Antonio Damasio hat sich im Interview mit Technology Review über Gefühle als biologischen Forschungsgegenstand geäußert. Der Mensch unterschätze Gefühle noch immer. Antonio Damaso, renommierter Professor für Hirnforschung an der University of Southern California, hat im Interview mit Technology Review über aktuelle Erkenntnisse in den Neurowissenschaften der letzten Jahre gesprochen. Die Wichtigste: Jahrzehntelang hatten Biologen Emotionen und Gefühle als uninteressant abgetan. Damaso zeigte, dass sie jedoch für lebenserhaltende Prozesse fast aller Lebewesen von zentraler Bedeutung sind. “Das Besondere an uns Menschen ist, dass wir grundlegende Prozesse zur Regulierung des Lebens nutzen, darunter eben auch Emotionen und Gefühle. Aber wir verbinden sie mit geistigen Prozessen in einer Art, dass wir eine neue Welt um uns herum schaffen”, so der Forscher……


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4 Simple Methods for Quicker Decision-Making for Procrastinators and the Indecisive

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Life is full of choice, and whilst it is understandable that we fret over life’s major pathways—Should I go to university? Should I change career sector this late on? When should we start a family?—we are also now fretting over the smaller things in life. Why? Well, simply because we have so many options available to us. The humble weekly grocery shop has turned into an epic adventure, with dozens of brands on offer for every item. On average, we make thousands of decisions a day. When options are overwhelming though, you can’t help but feel pressured into making the right choice. No wonder then that deciding what to wear today, whether to have another biscuit, or what to cook for the family occasion is bringing us out in a cold sweat! If this relates to you, then it is time to regain control and start making snappier decisions…….


See on lifehack.org