Review and Samples of Fujifilm XF 10-24mm f/4 R OIS Lens | Derek Olsen


Verdict:

I give this lens 4 out of 5 stars. I enjoyed my time with this lens but I’m going to sell it for something more compact and less bulky (*see UPDATE 1). It’s a little awkwardly weighted on the XE-2 and I found myself shooting only within the 10mm – 14mm range 80% of the time. So I’m purchasing the Zeiss 12mm f/2.8 Touit * — a nice middle ground that will take up less space in my bag. The Fujifilm 10-24mm f/4 is a high-quality lens that could definitely pass for certain professional uses but perhaps not for huge fine-art prints (though that’s up for debate). While compiling the photos for this review I almost convinced myself to keep the lens! If you don’t mind the extra weight and size or f/4 aperture, this is is fantastic purchase……..


See on derekolsonphotography.com

The Fuji switch part II: Weddings… | Ben Jacobsen


Welcome to the second part of my fuji X-T1 camera review.  This post will focus primarily on how the X-T1 performs while shooting weddings.  Part I of the review (which focuses on landscape photography) is here.  I broke the review up into two sections because the two genres are quite different and I figured it’d be nice to have two shorter reviews that are more specific to what people might want to read.  First off, let me explain that I’m NOT a full time wedding photographer.  I never have been and don’t plan to be anytime soon.  I’ve been a second shooter for some friends of mine for the last three summers which is a role I really enjoy.  I’ve also had the pleasure of shooting a few weddings for close friends and I always bring my kit along to weddings I’m invited to (that’s where the above image came from).  Because I’m a second shooter I’ve been asked not to share any images from my most recent wedding until the primary photographers wrap up their blog post…   So this image won’t have a ton of images in it for a few more weeks.  For that I apologize but I figured I’d get my thoughts written down now while they’re fresh.




See on benjacobsenphoto.com

Seeing Better is Black and White (The Fuji Monochrom) | James Conley


A major impediment most new photographers face is that color is the default mode of expression. Not only are we inundated by color images in every possible medium, but digital cameras presume color as the chosen palette. The tragic fact of these defaults is that it interferes with the development of seeing subjects and places emphasis on the impossible task of trying to capture a color reality which makes little natural sense in two dimensions. The result is a great deal of frustration when the captured image doesn’t match the experience of color. Few cameras are available that address this problem. The Leica Monochrom is one of few. The Monochrom only records in black and white, and only displays its menus and previews in black and white. It’s the gold standard for capturing black and white—after film. However, the Monochrom body alone costs about $8k. That’s a lot of money to get rid of color. There are cheaper ways. The cheapest way to shoot black and white, of course, is to switch to film. Using a film rangefinder is one of the fastest routes to improving the composition and content of your images, and you don’t even need a darkroom…….



See on effeleven.blogspot.fr

T-Minus Cologne | Patrick La Roque


We’re almost there: tomorrow at 18h55 we fly to Frankfurt. Then it’s a train to Cologne and the adventure begins. I’d love to say everything’s packed and ready…. Sure… Like that’s how life works with three young kids in the house. But we’re getting there. Below is THE KIT: X100S with the wide and tele converters. I debated taking the X-T1 for a few hours, just enough time to realize I was reverting to exactly the same reflexes the X100 had liberated me from three years ago. Which lens do I take? This? No, that? No. Way. The reason I have the converters is because Fujifilm Canada is loaning them to me along with the X100S itself — I still have the X100 and they were nice enough to let me borrow this one for the duration of our trip. As much as I still love the original X100 there’s been quite a jump in performance since its release and I’m rather used to this by now. The X-T1 does tend to spoil a guy. The old X100 is fine for quick outings but Cologne, Venice and Rome? I might’ve regretted my choice along the way (even though I know the images would’ve been great)…….




See on laroquephoto.com

Paris | XF 10-24mm | Patrice Michellon


Let’s face it, shooting architecture and landscapes is not something I feel comfortable with. However I’ve always been attracted by long exposure and sunset shots. Three things were missing so far in order to start an long exposure architecture project and I managed to get two of those already:

  • the will (yep, got it eventually)
  • a proper lens. The Fujinon XF 10-24mm f/4 has been delivered!
  • filters (still missing those babies but it doesn’t prevent from training and shooting)

Unfortunately for me the 10-24mm I ordered came with dust between two lenses and I could only play with it for half a day before sending it back. The pictures below are a tiny set of what I could quickly shoot in the morning before going to work and during my lunch time in Paris…..


See on patricemichellon.com

LNDNWLK 2.0 – Taking online friendships offline | MirrorLessons


Too many times have I heard the complaint that social media, despite the connotation of its name, has rendered us more antisocial than ever before. Locked away in our rooms, we chat with individuals who play no part in our actual day-to-day existence, tricking ourselves into believing that our social life is much richer than it actually is. This is why Mathieu and I are both firm believers that the “social media cycle” isn’t complete until online relationships are taken offline. As friendly as you can become with people via a social platform such as Twitter or Google+, there is nothing quite comparable to meeting someone face-to-face……


The Netherlands, Germany, Italy, Spain, Ireland, the USA, Canada and the UK–eight nations enjoying one another’s company under one roof in the cosmopolitan city of London, all thanks to relationships being taken from the superficial online realm to the geniune offline world. This is the true definition of social media, and the spirit with which LNDNWLK came into being……..


See on bestmirrorlesscamerareviews.com

My dreamed Fuji XT on my next photo tour | Harry Fisch


I first started using Fuji X-100, thanks to a happy accident: I fell down a flight of stairs in Varanasi, India, and destroyed my Canon 5D.   As a secondary emergency camera, I had bought my  X-100 before my trip, and so began my relationship with Fuji. Later on, when the Fuji XPRO-1 appeared on the scene, I sold my Canon equipment, and since then I’ve been using exclusively Fuji equipment. Though, I must clarify now, I have no special deal with Fuji; this is  all my sincere and  own opinion. I’ve taken tons of photographs in low light conditions with my Fuji, and with one of these night shots on one of my photo tours I won the National Geographic World Photo prize in 2012  (though it was disqualified at the end of things, for reasons unrelated to the camera). As well, in the low light category I was a finalist in the 2013 Sony World Photo Awards.   Again, my trusty Fuji was my camera of choice. I should say here that 95% of the time I like to use a  manual set  focus button, and then shoot. I feel it faster this way…….


See on nomadphotoexpeditions.com

La Ferme | XF 56mm APD | Patrick La Roque


These are tentative steps, her first away from us; away from home. We spend a few hours moving in, exploring every nook and cranny, sharing her joy and excitement. But when the time comes for us leave… All that freedom becomes harder to bear. We walk away through tears and it’s hard but we know it’ll pass. A week from now, when we come back, she’ll barely say hello — too busy with her newfound friends. Letting go is the toughest necessary thing we do……




See on laroquephoto.com

Fuji’s Classic Chrome Film Simulation Brings the Magic of Kodachrome to the Digital Realm | Petapixel


The salty taste of the ocean was the first thing I sensed when arriving at Stockholm. It was hotter than the average August day. It felt good. Like a gorgeous summer day. The city was busy on that Friday afternoon. Almost like it couldn’t wait for the weekend to start. It didn’t take us long to feel the city. To sense its flow. Its people and its beauty. Stockholm seemed to be an open and friendly place. It smiled at us from the very beginning. Everyone was helpful and open……


See on petapixel.com

Get Lost In Stockholm | Ivo Scholz


For what it’s worth, there seems to be something special about cities at the sea. They all have one more thing to offer I guess. I remember the feeling from other cities like San Francisco, Barcelona, Cagliari or Amsterdam. And now, the city alloted on 14 islands as well. The salty taste of the ocean was the first thing I sensed when arriving at Stockholm. It was hotter than the average August day. It felt good. Like a gorgeous summer day. The city was busy on that Friday afternoon. Almost like it couldn’t wait for the weekend to start. It didn’t take us long to feel the city. To sense its flow. Its people and its beauty. Stockholm seemed to be an open and friendly place. It smiled at us from the very beginning. Everyone was helpful and open……..


See on ivoscholz.com